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The future of music that were completely wrong

Groups of guitars are on the way out

[LISTEN] The Beatles talk to Brian Matthew about being famous
This is perhaps the most famous quote about the early years of The Beatles, and while it’s definitely based on real events, it has perhaps been distorted by what happened next to such an extent that it looks far worse than it was intended to be.

The source of the quote is Beatles manager Brian Epstein, relaying the message he was given by Dick Rowe, head of Decca Records, on why they were not interested in signing the band in 1962. In Hunter Davies’ authorised biography, The Beatles, Epstein remembered: “He told me they didn’t like the sound. Groups of guitars were on the way out. I told him I was completely confident that these boys were going to be bigger than Elvis Presley.”

To be fair to Mr Rowe, in 1962’s pop charts “groups of guitars” meant The Shadows. No record label was interested in signing The Beatles at that time. The fact that his was the sole quote attributed to this fairly enormous misjudgment of the band’s commercial potential by all the major London labels

A Composer Who Made The Everyday Extraordinary

Born Dec. 9, 1927 in Paris, Pierre Henry was enchanted by everything he heard. He entered the Paris Conservatory when he was just 10 years old. There, he studied with the great teacher Nadia Boulanger, whose students eventually included everyone from Aaron Copland to Quincy Jones. It was an auspicious start to an audacious career.

In his early 20s, he helped usher in a musical revolution with a style called musique concrète — “concrete music” — collages of prerecorded and manipulated sounds from both electronic and acoustic sources.

In The Art Of Sounds, Henry spoke about how deliberately he created those collages. “Musique concrète is the art of decision,” he said. “It’s the art of choice. You select one sound over others and that’s where composing begins.”

Musique concrète was born just after World War II — as France rebuilt, the government established a public radio and television channel, RTF. The project included an experimental studio where composers could create new work.

It was in that studio that Henry and his then-mentor Pierre Schaeffer, wrote a groundbreaking piece, their Symphonie pour un homme seul (Symphony For A Lone Man). It became a legend among musicians. Of this composition, Schaeffer wrote:

“The lone man should

The weirdest excuses for gig cancellations

Pigeon strike

A large venue, of the sort that plays host to rock concerts, is apparently a haven for pigeons, who will often roost in the upper scaffolding, and then fly around while the band performs. And where there are pigeons, there will undoubtedly be pigeon droppings. Often venues will bring in specialist pest controllers to deal with their infestation, but clearly this was not the case in St Louis in 2010, when Kings of Leonbassist Jared Followill found himself the target of a particular flock of feathered menaces.

After a couple of splatters landed on his clothes during the first two songs, he was hit on the face, close to his mouth, and the band elected to call a halt to their set for health and hygiene reasons.

 Getting bored of your own music

Highlights of Iggy Azalea’s set at 1Xtra Live 2013

There must come a point for any performer when it feels like they need to change gear a bit, take a break, refresh their sound and absorb a few different

Explains Every Song on His New Album

 The hunched 73-year-old recently turned up in a segment on TMZ’s TV show, of all places, reporting on “Putin,” a track from his latest LP, Dark Matter. The song is a biting faux-anthem for the Russian president, with lines like, “When he takes his shirt off/Makes mewanna be a lady!” It’s a goof, but TMZ was stumped. “Is he puckering up—or poking fun?” asked the clip’s cartoonish narrator, after Newman affably tried to explain the song to a paparazzi cameraman in an airport. Then the gossip site’s newsroom launched into an argument about the song’s true meaning—as evidence, one diminutive TMZ staffer even attested to the bigotry of Newman’s 1977 hit “Short People,” a song that was written to expose the ills of baseless bigotry.

When I bring up this TMZ appearance to Newman, he sounds genuinely amused. “Yeah, there I was!” he drawls. “Actually, I’m probably the only person who likes that cameraman—it’s just that he’s got his camera with him.” That Newman is able to find some humanity in a guy who hounds celebrities and is generally considered a pariah is no surprise. He’s had a lot of practice.

A Master Of Musical Understatement

Walter Becker on those endless (ridiculous) listicles ranking the “Guitar Gods of the 1970s.” He’s rarely mentioned in the same breath as major dudes like Eric Clapton, or Jimmy Page, or Duane Allman, or Carlos Santana, or Billy Gibbons, or Frank Zappa.

Becker, who died Sunday at the age of 67, stands apart from that class, off in a semi-neglected dark corner, his contribution to the rock canon less clearly defined. He had technical dexterity on the guitar, but was hardly a shredder. Or a flamethrower. He didn’t grandstand. Sometimes he didn’t even play the big solos — he regularly hired studio hotshots to provide firepower on the Steely Dan hits he cowrote with keyboardist and singer Donald Fagen.

If pop music is a constant tug of war between the reassuringly familiar and the jolt of the modernist new, Becker’s gift was the ability to hit both extremes at once. What Becker added to Steely Dan was an elusive strain of magic — the terse little melodic thing that turned out to be exactly what the music needed. And nothing more.

Love messages hidden in pop songs

Taylor Swift – We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together

Renowned as something of a serial kiss-and-not-quite-teller, Taylor Swift has many songs rumoured to be about old flames. One of the best, though, is this love-hate number, believed by fans to be about her relationship with actor Jake Gyllenhaal (telltale clues in the video, they claim, include a scene in which the actor playing Taylor’s ex gives her his scarf to wear – Swift had been pictured wearing Gyllenhaal’s scarf in public – and a bracelet similar to one gifted to her by Gyllenhaal).

Although the power of the on-off infatuation is clear, it doesn’t paint a flattering picture: “I’m really gonna miss you picking fights and me / Falling for it screaming that I’m right and you / Would hide away and find your piece of mind / With some indie record that’s much cooler than mine.”

Swift told USA Today that the song was about an ex who “made me feel like I wasn’t as good or as relevant as these hipster

The Music of Twin Peaks

Trouble were one of many acts who played the fictional bar during one long production day that also saw handpicked artists including Nine Inch Nails, Sharon Van Etten, and Eddie Vedder take their turn to be directed by Lynch while pretending to play their own music. Early on in the series’ run, these Roadhouse scenes could seem incongruous, like clunky appendages often added to the end of every episode. Yet their role began to reveal itself as the show evolved: The scenes, and the music within them, are used as a guide back toward something resembling reality, a reassuring embrace of the familiar following the rest of the show’s deeply disturbing and bizarre images. In “The Return,” once you’re in the Roadhouse, you know you’re safe—relatively speaking, at least.

Even though the show’s music has been largely defined by those star-studded Roadhouse performances, they were never part of the original plan. “It wasn’t in the script,” Hurley tells me, adding that the scenes were constructed to allow editorial fluidity—to act as a punctuation tool—because Lynch imagined “The Return” not as a TV show but rather an 18-hour film broken down and shown in parts.

The lead singers for the band Linkin Park

Chester Bennington is, one of the lead singers for the band Linkin Park and a former singer for Stone Temple Pilots, has died. His death was confirmed to NPR Thursday afternoon by the Los Angeles County Coroner’s office, which said that his body was discovered at a house in the 2800 block of Palos Verdes Estates in Los Angeles and that investigators are currently on the scene. The death is “being looked at as a possible suicide at this time,” according to Brian Elias of the coroner’s office. Bennington was 41 years old.

Linkin Park member Mike Shinoda posted that he is “shocked and heartbroken” and that an official statement from the band is forthcoming.

Earlier this month, Linkin Park finished a European and U.K. leg of an international tour in support of its current album, One More Light, with guest artists Machine Gun Kelly, One OK Rock and Snoop Dogg; the band’s next scheduled tour date is July 27 in Mansfield, Mass.

Although Linkin Park never gained much critical acclaim, the rap-rock band was a popular staple in the early 2000s. Its debut album in 2000, Hybrid Theory, became the best-selling rock album of that decade, and the group went

Houston’s Jazz Envoys Describe

Kendrick Scott Oracle, is stocked with serious talent, each musician a distinguished leader in his own right. Among them is guitarist Mike Moreno who, like Scott, originally hails from Houston, and has been keeping an anxious watch on the events of the past week.

The catastrophic wake of Hurricane Harvey has stretched across East Texas and into Louisiana, taking lives and uprooting tens of thousands of others, while causing billions of dollars in damage and disruption. But the flooding in Houston has been a specific worry for that city’s jazz diaspora, which includes some of the most important artists of the present era.

Those musicians all have families back home, and in the days since

Early songs the stars left behind

Ill-advised novelty singles, dubious dance-pop directions, fits of pique or simply just sub-par tunes that should never have been released – open enough closets and you’re sure to discover a few interesting skeletons. Here are the early songs that had the stars wishing life came with a ‘clear history’ option.

Radiohead – Pop Is Dead

Radiohead’s 1993 breakthrough hit Creep used to be the albatross around the band’s neck. By its critics considered self-pitying and derivative, it became so unrepresentative of the band’s subsequent material – and yet so oft-requested – that they refused to play it for a long time, although they have relented in recent years; their rendition at 2017’s Glastonbury festival sounded almost sincere.

Pop Is Dead, on the other hand – another single from the same year – has long been consigned to the dustbin of history. A clumsy music biz satire, the band’s Ed O’Brien called it a “hideous mistake”. It didn’t even make the bonus disc of Radiohead’s 2008 ‘Best Of’ compilation and is currently unavailable